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Q&A podcast: How did Julian Clary feel about having Le Grand Mort written for him?

In Audio, Features, Interviews, London theatre, Native, Opinion, Plays, Quotes, Sticky, Ticket recommendations by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

In an at turns hysterically funny and extremely touching post-show discussion, Julian Clary, co-star James Nelson-Joyce and director Christopher Renshaw talked about the legacy (and still-tangible presence) of author Stephen Clark as well as speaking in verse while cooking, onstage nudity, willy socks, life and death and much more.

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LE GRAND MORT – Trafalgar Studios ★★★★

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Special Events, Ticket recommendations by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

Trafalgar Studios, London

****

Written by Stephen ClarkDirected by Christopher Renshaw

Julian Clary
It is a rare treat these days to see a play written for its star. So it is with Le Grand Mort, penned by Stephen Clark and created specifically with Julian Clary in mind. Amidst a whirlpool of emotions, the unintended and unspoken sadness of the night is that Clark tragically died last year, never seeing the play brought to life.
Clark has written an exquisite piece that places Clary as Michael, a 50-something architect with a lifestyle that’s a fusion of Hannibal Lecter with, for those who can remember back that far, Graham Kerr’s Galloping Gourmet. (Younger readers may prefer to context Come Dine With Me.) Indeed as the play opens and Clary’s cookery commences, the air inside the compact Trafalgar 2 becomes quickly thick with the scent (stench?) of frying onions.
The action never leaves Michael’s kitchen, a fully functioning showpiece of a set from designer Justin Nardella, in which the preening professional is preparing pasta puttanesca (literally whore’s pasta) as he awaits the arrival of the much younger, rough-trade Tim. We learn that this is the first potentially romantic liaison of the two men after a period of pub-based flirting, but with a rack of chic kitchen knives ever prominent, menace is clear from the outset.
Clark’s writing has a cadence that’s rarely found these days, conjuring up images from a prose that is as assonant as it is meticulous. The whole piece runs for a non-stop 90mins, the first third of which is virtually a Clary monologue. One could almost be witnessing a grown-up version of The Joan Collins Fan Club such is Clary’s wit and persona – even if the patter he regales is a gruesome comment on death and necrophilia.
The arrival of James Nelson-Joyce’s Tim catapults the evening into a 21st century Sleuth. We learn that little of what the young man says is true – however it is clear from both his perfect physique and razor sharp wit that matches Michael word for word, that he is irresistible to the architect.
Clark’s writing is graphic and as his narrative unfolds to encompass incestuous paedophilia it is clear that his two protagonists are deeply damaged souls. But whilst the play’s language and its acting soar, it is hard to care too much for either man – even if Nelson-Joyce’s impressive nudity does briefly shift one’s attention from cook to cock.
The performances here are unquestionably first class and while Le Grand Mort may not be quite the comedy it set out to be, treat yourself to a large glass of Montepulciano and savour the work that’s on offer. Clark truly proves that there’s no fool like an old fool.

Runs to 28 OctoberPhoto credit: Scott Rylander






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New post-show Q&A: Join Terri to talk to Julian Clary about Le Grand Mort, the new play written for him

In Interviews, London theatre, Plays, Special Events, Sticky, Ticket recommendations by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

As part of her ongoing post-show Q&A series, on Wednesday 27 September 2017, Mates co-founder Terri Paddock will talk to Julian Clary, his co-star and director of Le Grand Mort, the new play written especially for him about to receive its world premiere in a strictly limited season at Trafalgar Studios 2. Got any questions?






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Pure Imagination: Leslie Bricusse on searching for the perfect song

In Cabaret, Features, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Quotes by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

How well do you know the work of composer-lyricist Leslie Bricusse? How many songs can you name by this living legend… apart from “Pure Imagination” (and the “Oompa Loompa” theme) from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. How about, for starters, Bond classics “Goldfinger” and “You Only Live Twice”, “If I Ruled the World”, “What Kind of Fool Am I?”, “The Candy Man”, “This Is the Moment”, “Can You Read My Mind?” (from Superman), “My Old Man’s a Dustman”, “The Pink Panther” and “Talk to the Animals” (from Doctor Doolittle)? And that really is, only for starters.






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PURE IMAGINATION – St James Theatre

In Cabaret, Musicals, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

This was a glamorous night (yes, I know that’s by Ivor Novello): Joan Collins, Petula Clark, Richard Fleeshman, Michael Feinstein, Gloria Hunniford, Nanette Newman, Hayley Mills and Una Stubbs. And that was just the audience – plus Carol Thatcher and Jeffrey Archer for some hideous reason, although it was a great pleasure to see Gyles Brandreth buying their interval drinks because they weren’t on the guest list.






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PURE IMAGINATION – St James Theatre

In London theatre, Reviews by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

Who can take a set list? Sprinkle it with class……
… as through two hours a delicious cast of 5 chart a course through nigh on 60 of the songs of lyricist Leslie Bricusse. Unashamedly a ‘juke-box musical’, the show marks producer Danielle Tarento’s first foray into that genre, with a combination of both song snatches and entire numbers as Bricusse’s remarkable body of work is referenced and respected.