Mates blogger: John Chapman


John Chapman is one of over 45 theatre bloggers who are part of the MyTheatreMates collective. This page features John's posts on MyTheatreMates. Take a look at our full list of theatre bloggers and our aggregated feed of all our Mates' posts. We’re always looking for new theatre bloggers. Could that be you? Learn about how to join us.
John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.
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The latest from John on MyTheatreMates

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Further outings to the virtual Edinburgh Fringe

In Edinburgh Festival, Online shows, Opinion, Regional theatre, Reviews by John ChapmanLeave a Comment

For my first Edinburgh Festival “visit” last week, I found myself following a theme (more by accident than design) but this week I thought I’d freeform it a bit more. After all that’s what the Fringe is all about, isn’t it? Picking stuff at random, seeing what takes your fancy, taking a punt on something new. Except it didn’t quite work out like that….

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‘Couldn’t be more timely’: PLACE PRINTS 1-4 (Online review)

In Audio, Native, Online shows, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by John ChapmanLeave a Comment

Place Prints is a fascinating audio series from writer David Rudkin about places in the UK. There are certain locations where that sense of the past is much stronger than in others. These places have their own stories and voices and Rudkin tells them with a sense of lyricism from which contemporary writers might well learn.


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