‘Surreal & very funny’: Elephant & Castle – Camden People’s Theatre

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Camden People’s Theatre – until 20 October 2018
Guest reviewer: Jack Solloway

Elephant & Castle is a strange and precariously funny gig-theatre show about the lives of Lillian Henley, a musician and silent film pianist, and her teeth-grinding somnambulist husband, Tom Adams. Whilst this may sound a little far-fetched, the play is very much rooted in the performers’ own experiences. Acting out their relationship, using live music and verbatim sleep recordings, Elephant & Castle dramatises the bizarre reality of Tom’s slow-wave sleep parasomnia and his relationship with Lillian.

A regular sleepwalker and night-time chatterbox, Tom has a sleep disorder which sees him regularly blurt out and occasionally act on his darker impulses whilst asleep, blissfully unaware of his nocturnal activities. Inspired by the first time Lillian shared a bed with him and discovered this unusual quirk (‘I want to get in a wardrobe and take you to Elephant and Castle,” confessed Tom’s subconscious), the show rifles through the closet of their marriage and delves into the darkly nonsensical Narnia of the sleep talker’s mind.

More Bakerloo-Northern Line than CS Lewis, the play swaps Mr Tumnus for Mr Indignant (or so Lillian calls his sweary, sleeping persona), dresses him in paisley, and has him do a striptease with a Stratocaster. He is backed by Americana-infused nocturnes with tight harmonies and a Freudian twist.

Placing one foot in this dream world and the other in the bedroom, Lillian’s eye-batting
tender disbelief at her husband’s nightly antics coaxes a coquettish performance from Tom, whose ignominious, unconscious self occasionally emerges mid-song, literally, barking mad and bare-arsedly pissy with the world.

Surreal and very funny, Tom and Lillian bring a Cash and Carter-type chemistry to their
music as well as their comedy, shooting questioning glances and embarrassed half-smiles at one another as they make light of their vulnerabilities. Staged around a single, moveable mattress, bed designer Amy Nicholson’s prop (though what has been designed here is not exactly clear) shelters and reveals the couple, and sometimes comes between them, playfully inviting audiences into the emotional and physical battleground of their bedroom.

Retro music, home footage and a silent film weave together an incredibly honest story that tells reveals a different kind of normality – one which is personal, generous and occasionally enlightening – particularly in terms of Tom’s diagnosis.

Eye-openingly cheeky, if less experimental than it claims to be, Elephant and Castle is a joy, quizzical and gently thought-provoking, delivering sound performances from Adams and Henley, underscored witty lyricism, retro sounds and daft, brow-raising humour.

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Laura Kressly
Laura is a US immigrant who has lived in the UK since 2004. Originally trained as an actor with a specialism in Shakespeare, she enjoyed many pre-recession years working as a performer, director and fringe theatre producer. When the going got too tough, she took a break to work in education as a support worker, then a secondary school drama teacher. To keep up with the theatrical world, she started reviewing for Everything Theatre and Remotegoat in 2013. In 2015, Laura started teaching part time in order to get back into theatre. She is now a freelance fringe theatre producer and runs her independent blog, theplaysthethinguk.com.
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Laura Kressly on RssLaura Kressly on Twitter
Laura Kressly
Laura is a US immigrant who has lived in the UK since 2004. Originally trained as an actor with a specialism in Shakespeare, she enjoyed many pre-recession years working as a performer, director and fringe theatre producer. When the going got too tough, she took a break to work in education as a support worker, then a secondary school drama teacher. To keep up with the theatrical world, she started reviewing for Everything Theatre and Remotegoat in 2013. In 2015, Laura started teaching part time in order to get back into theatre. She is now a freelance fringe theatre producer and runs her independent blog, theplaysthethinguk.com.

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