‘Not your average play about male bonding’: FAT JEWELS – Hope Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Michael DavisLeave a Comment

Hope Theatre, London – until 21 July 2018

Written by Joseph Skelton and directed by Luke Davies, Fat Jewels isn’t your average play about male bonding. Following a long conversation in the pub, family friend Danny (Robert Walters) brings young Pat home so they can have a few bevvies and finish off their food from the chip shop. Pat (Hugh Train) is chuffed at having someone to spend time with and is eager to please. Having someone to confide in about his bad dreams takes a weight off Pat’s shoulders. However, Danny doesn’t want Pat to leave his flat and thinks they should work on their therapy together to deal with Pat’s ‘pent-up aggression’…

From the off, the audience senses there’s something not quite right with the scenario and having guessed quite early on what was about to transpire, I confess I was more than a little uncomfortable throughout.

While it’s obvious that Danny has an agenda and Pat’s trusting nature makes him vulnerable, it’s also very noticeable that Danny has unresolved issues of his own and that his techniques are really for his benefit. The play shows how two men are ill-equipped for life. Not from an academic or monetary perspective – though that’s certainly a factor – but because of the absence of meaningful relationships in their lives who would look out for their best interests.

Train gives a very committed performance as Pat, the sweat (the ‘fat jewels’) that the character sheds during his antics – all genuine, as the audience succumbs to the heat too. Of course ‘fat jewels’ has other meanings in the play – the nickname Dan gave Pat’s mother when they were at school and ‘sweat’ as the unsightly part of oneself that can’t be hidden…

‘Danny’ as a character is manipulative, using ‘gaslighting’ to get around Pat’s reservations. Walters, however, imbues the character with some ‘understandable’ qualities which are more apparent when the full facts of Danny’s past come to light.

The play’s visceral denouement is guaranteed to indelibly stay with the audience, but from the ‘shattering’ of the past, the men find the wherewithal to start over and move forward.

Michael Davis on Twitter
Michael Davis
Michael Davis is a former actor and director. He’s passionate about fringe theatre and publicising shows that don’t necessarily receive mainstream attention. He’s previously reviewed for Female Arts and The Play’s the Thing and now runs his own site, Breaking the Fourth Wall. Michael is interested and knowledgeable about all aspects of the arts. He tweets @Michael30517721.
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Michael Davis on Twitter
Michael Davis
Michael Davis is a former actor and director. He’s passionate about fringe theatre and publicising shows that don’t necessarily receive mainstream attention. He’s previously reviewed for Female Arts and The Play’s the Thing and now runs his own site, Breaking the Fourth Wall. Michael is interested and knowledgeable about all aspects of the arts. He tweets @Michael30517721.