Doing Shakespeare at the Bridewell Theatre

‘It’s a joyful piece of theatre to take us out of the misery of lockdown’: DOING SHAKESPEARE – Bridewell Theatre

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Bridewell Theatre, London – until 13 November 2021

“A hit, a very palpable hit”. It may seem odd to begin a review with a quotation from the Bard of Avon (and please feel free to take a stab at which character is saying it in the comments box below), but this one is appropriate because that is what Northern Comedy Theatre has on its hands.

After a one night premiere of Doing Shakespeare on home territory, they have whisked the show straight down to London with a two-week run at the Bridewell – appropriately just across the Thames from the recreation of the Globe and, by all accounts, the storage point of the original timbers when Shakespeare’s company dismantled their building, upped sticks from Shoreditch and set up home on the South Bank.

It’s a joyful piece of theatre to take us out of the misery of lockdown, celebrating not only our national playwright but also the scores of amateur societies such as the Felching Players who have waited so long to get back on stage – as, of course, have the NCT themselves. However, they are not exactly new to this play.

In brief, it was first presented as a Zoom play quite early on in the first lockdown after which four sequels were spawned known collectively as the Doing… plays. It was one of the very first pieces to emerge that used the idea of a Zoom meeting itself to create the context and provide a good deal of fun into the bargain. The conceit was that this ragbag of acting talent (and I’m referring here to the Felching Players, not the NCT itself) were coming together to perform a Shakespeare play online but, due to an “administrative error” on the part of the director, plus a healthy dose of wilful misunderstanding by others, they had all prepared different plays.

Now that obviously wasn’t going to work on a live stage, but writer David Spicer (“with a bit of help from William Shakespeare”)  has come up with an ingenious way round that, which I won’t spoil here but which makes it all too probable that the same situation arises. What to do? Well, obviously in the best traditions of “the show must go on regardless” and the fact that they have been waiting for an age to start restrutting their stuff, they decide to forge on. To achieve this they mash up the various bits they have learned with some cod, improvised and basically meaningless speeches; as far as they’re concerned the audience won’t spot the difference anyway. This leads to an increasingly manic second half as we see them putting all this into practice with Shakespeare being diced, sliced and put through a mincer and Spicer’s script becoming an ingenious labyrinth of some of Will’s best bits. Thus, when Lear asks the question “Which of you shall we say doth love us most?” we don’t get responses from Goneril, Regan or Cordelia; instead, we get Katherine and some of her impassioned dialogue from The Taming Of the Shrew. Remarkably it almost makes some sort of sense though clearly not to Tom and Rebecca who are gamely hanging on to their own characters; meanwhile Judith wanders in and out spouting obscure bits from Pericles – the one she “did for A Level”. There’s also an ongoing tussle for power and the centre of the stage between Ebon/Hamlet, Jason/Romeo and Terri/a witch from Macbeth though nobody is allowed to utter the latter’s name for fear of dramatic calamity. Actually, I don’t know why they are bothering to worry about that because their performances are  execrable to begin with – and again, let me make it clear that it’s The Felching Players not the Northern Comedy Theatre which I’m referring to.

‘It’s a joyful piece of theatre to take us out of the misery of lockdown’: @JohnChapman398 revels in @comedynorthern’s #DoingShakespeare at @BridewellCentre. (Don’t miss tonight’s perf with post-show Q&A chaired by Mate @TerriPaddock!) #featured #comedy

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John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.
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John Chapman on RssJohn Chapman on Twitter
John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.

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