Mourning Show Boat: Why do great shows close early?

In Features, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Plays, Quotes, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

When the news came in late yesterday that, just a fortnight after opening, Show Boat had posted West End closing notices, I was both shocked and not the least bit surprised.

Get all social feeds for Show Boat and its cast on www.stagefaves.com

Get all social feeds for Show Boat and its cast on www.stagefaves.com

To be clear, Daniel Evans’ Sheffield Crucible production isn’t shuttering immediately at the New London Theatre, where it opened on Monday 25 April, following previews from 9 April. You still have another 15 weeks to see this 1927 Rodgers and Hammerstein classic before its final bow on 27 August – so what the hell are you waiting for?

But this revised last performance date – and let’s hope it’s not brought forward any sooner – cuts the originally planned limited season more than five months short. (The production had been scheduled to run until 7 January 2017 – after which School of Rock is tipped to take over the New London).

So, while it’s in no danger of breaking speed-of-closure records (remember The Man in the Iron Mask, anyone?), to close after a four-month run, and to announce that closure just a fortnight after opening, is a major disappointment. Especially so after the kind of reviews Show Boat garnered – a second set of five-star raves to add to the initial praise heaped upon the production when it first opened in Sheffield last year.

Here’s why I wasn’t surprised by the news: I didn’t attend opening night. Big West End openings can give you a false view. It’s someone’s job to ensure there are no empty seats on an opening night. And, critics aside (potentially, though not in the case of this show), the invited audience – people involved in the show plus agents, family, friends and a smattering of celebrity guests – are guaranteed to receive the show warmly. Standing ovations are de rigueur.

At the New London, two nights after, when I attended Show Boat, there were no celebrities, but there were plenty of empty seats. For whatever reason, and in spite of the press plaudits, already the show was struggling to fill its 1000-seater home.

Tracie Bennett plays the title role in Mrs Henderson Presents at the Noel Coward Theatre. © Tristram Kenton

Show Boat’s closure announcement comes a week after another recent regional transfer, the four-time Olivier-nominated Mrs Henderson Presents, posted notices at the Noel Coward Theatre. By the time Mrs Henderson finishes on 18 June, it too will have run for just four months in the West End.

What might have made a difference to the fortunes of these two shows? In the case of Mrs Henderson: stronger reviews (remember that stinker in the Standard), less nudity, an Olivier win? In the case of Show Boat, bigger-name stars, a smaller theatre with more passing footfall (and fewer confusing, conference centre style entrances and exits – the New London can be a challeng), timing (opening just before a Bank Holiday weekend could affect coverage)?

I personally love both of these productions. It’s frustrating when shows you rate don’t catch fire with audiences when you know they’re so much better than many of the hits that run and run. So, for my part, let me end just by strongly recommending that you see both before it’s too late.

Mrs Henderson Presents runs at the Noel Coward Theatre until 18 June. Show Boat is at the New London Theatre until 27 August 2016.

 

Gina Beck and Chris Peluso play lovers Magnolia and Gaylord in Show Boat at the New London Theatre

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Terri Paddock
Terri Paddock runs the Terri Paddock Group, which provides content and social media marketing services for theatre clients across channels including MyTheatreMates.com, StageFaves.com, Stage Talk and TerriPaddock.com. Previously,
Terri Paddock founded WhatsOnStage.com and the WhatsOnStage Awards, running the company and its events from 1996 to 2013. Terri is also the author of two novels, Come Clean and Beware the Dwarfs, and has previously written for the Evening Standard, Independent, The Times and other national publications. She is renowned for her 'legendary' post-show Q&As and also produces the annual Critics' Circle Theatre Awards and acts as a digital, content strategy and event consultant for theatre, producers and other clients. She tweets about theatre at @TerriPaddock.

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Terri Paddock
Terri Paddock runs the Terri Paddock Group, which provides content and social media marketing services for theatre clients across channels including MyTheatreMates.com, StageFaves.com, Stage Talk and TerriPaddock.com. Previously,
Terri Paddock founded WhatsOnStage.com and the WhatsOnStage Awards, running the company and its events from 1996 to 2013. Terri is also the author of two novels, Come Clean and Beware the Dwarfs, and has previously written for the Evening Standard, Independent, The Times and other national publications. She is renowned for her 'legendary' post-show Q&As and also produces the annual Critics' Circle Theatre Awards and acts as a digital, content strategy and event consultant for theatre, producers and other clients. She tweets about theatre at @TerriPaddock.

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