Orpheus

‘The Greek legend is more or less intact’: ORPHEUS (Online review)

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The Greek myths have endured across the centuries partly because they are timeless stories that can be endlessly updated and reinvented. This is certainly the case with Orpheus and the version I am about to expand upon is actually my third during the pandemic.

Previously, I have followed the fortunes of a rock band in Myth and then those of a shop owner in Orpheus In the Record Shop. For, as I’m sure you’ll recall, music is absolutely at the centre of the tale. And so it also proves here in this joint production from The Flanagan Collective and Gobbledigook Theatre filmed at the Streatham Space Project.

Two companies in the persons of Alexander Flanagan-Wright and Phil Grainger; the first writes the words and the second composes the music. Both perform the piece and make a unified whole of what has come to be called gig theatre mixing what is essentially storytelling, poetry and music with a dose of audience participation.

The legend is more or less intact although Orpheus himself is now Dave an everyman figure who has reached his 30th birthday without achieving very much or going very far. Out on his birthday celebration he and his mates go into a bar where Springsteen is playing; his song “Dancing In The Dark” assumes the status of an anthem throughout the piece. Eurydice is still Eurydice, a wood nymph with whom Orpheus/Dave becomes besotted – enough to follow her down to the underworld when she suddenly dies. The rest of the tale is well known enough for it not to be repeated here and the key figures of Hades, Charon and Cerberus are all present and correct.

Flanagan-Wright starts out as friendly and relatable, chatting away to the audience as though they were all his best friends. But when the actual narrative starts he is transformed into a consummate storyteller with a Bardic quality that suits the subject matter. His words leap off the page, almost literally as he works from a leather bound notebook. They crackle with an energy reminiscent of Dylan Thomas (or is that because I watched Under Milk Wood recently?) and elevate language to a place of mystical power. Meanwhile Grainger in a semi minstrel’s costume (colourful baggy pantaloons) provides constant underscoring roaming the stage plucking at an acoustic guitar and in between sections breaking into plangent songs which add to the haunting quality of the narrative.

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John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.
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John Chapman on RssJohn Chapman on Twitter
John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.

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