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NEWS: Three new casts of children announced for Bugsy Malone return

In London theatre, Musicals, Native, News, Press Releases by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The Lyric Hammersmith today announces full casting for Sir Alan Parker’s Bugsy Malone, which returns to the Lyric for a limited 12-week run following the critically acclaimed, Olivier-nominated 2015 production. [The show also won the My Theatre Mates #AlsoRecognised Award for Best Ensemble Performance.] The production re-opens on 24 June 2016, previews from 11 June.

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NEWS: Bugsy Malone returns to Lyric Hammersmith, 11 Jun

In Children's theatre, London theatre, Musicals, Native, News, Press Releases by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The Lyric Hammersmith’s critically acclaimed sell-out production of Sir Alan Parker’s Bugsy Malone, with music and lyrics by Paul Williams and directed by Sean Holmes, will return to the Lyric for a 12 week run, opening on Friday 24 June 2016, with previews from Saturday 11 June. Casting to be announced.

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: Constellations, As Is, Bugsy Malone

In Audio, London theatre, Musicals, Native, Plays, Reviews by As Yet Unnamed London Theatre PodcastLeave a Comment

Every week, a group of regular, dedicated, independent theatre bloggers gather together for intelligent discussion “from the audience’s perspective” about plays and musicals they’ve recently seen in London. Lively, informed and entertaining. My Theatre Mates is delighted to syndicate the (still) As Yet Unnamed London Theatre Podcast (AYULTP). Shows discussed (with timings) in this week’s podcast: Orson’s Shadow – The …

BUGSY MALONE – Lyric Hammersmith

In Children's theatre, London theatre, Musicals, Reviews by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

The list of gangster movies inspired by 1920’s prohibition-era Chicago is lengthy, but it was not to be until 1976 that British director Alan Parker was to redefine the genre with Bugsy Malone. His award-winning feature film was an inspired musical romp for children, with the classic themes of love and crime all scaled down to a kids-eye view of morality and with sub-machine guns converted to spray custard-pie “splurge” rather than murderous lead.