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THE THREEPENNY OPERA – National Theatre

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Reviews by Edward SeckersonLeave a Comment

Rufus Norris may have commissioned a new adaptation of the Brecht by Simon Stephens to tick myriad boxes of contention from the politics of gender, sexuality, disability, and (naturally) the Middle East to the ever looming shadow of radical nationalism but no amount of theatrical panache and comic posturing can ever really disguise the fact that between the songs Threepenny Opera is a bore.

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Photos and podcast: Talking politics and musicals at The Buskers Opera

In Audio, Features, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Quotes by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

While the basic structure and characters are owed to Gay, the zany genius of The Buskers Opera calls more modern political and satirical influences most strongly to my mind. I’d liken it to a cross between Mike Bartlett‘s future history play King Charles III and Urinetown or, to bring it bang up to date with London’s current musical landscape, The Toxic Avenger.

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NEWS: David Burt joins The Buskers Opera, Crowdfunding launched for relaxed performance

In London theatre, Musicals, Native, News, Press Releases, Quotes by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The producers of The Buskers Opera, a brand new musical by Dougal Irvine (Departure Lounge, Laila, Britain’s Got Bhangra) and Park Theatre are today announcing the first-ever ‘relaxed’ performance at Park Theatre, to take place on Thursday 2 June 2016. The Producers of the show have launched a unique crowdfunding scheme in order help deliver this relaxed performance alongside their Arts …

TEDDY – Southwark Playhouse

In London theatre, Musicals, Plays, Reviews by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

Teddy is a new piece of theatre from Tristan Bernays and Dougal Irvine that sets out to depict the Teddy Boy era of 1950’s London. It’s all about rock and roll and austerity in post-war Britain, but much like the Teddy Boys it tells of, the play’s slickly packaged, but scratch its surface, and there’s a show unsure of itself and seemingly still seeking its own identity.