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NEWS: NYT presents season of new writing at Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, News, Opinion, Plays, Press Releases by Emma ClarendonLeave a Comment

Running at the Finborough Theatre as part of the National Youth Theatre’s 60th anniversary, the new season of work will run at the theatre throughout August 2016. This new season will feature three world premiere productions: James Fritz’s The Fall, Bola Agbaje’s Bitches and an adaptation of Mohsin Hamid’s Man Booker-shortlisted The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: Threepenny Opera, Kenny Morgan, A Subject of Scandal & Concern

In Audio, Features, London theatre, Musicals, Native, Opinion, Plays, Quotes, Ticket recommendations by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

This week the London theatre bloggers discuss Simon Stephens new version of Brecht’s The Threepenny Opera at the National, Mike Poulton’s take on Rattigan, Kenny Morgan, at the Arcola, and John Osborne revival A Subject of Scandal and Concern at the Finborough Theatre.

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SCHISM – Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Chicago, 1998. Harrison and Katherine are both struggling. Harrison’s wife recently left him and he gave up a challenging career choice for a safer one as a Math teacher. Fourteen-year-old Katherine’s school cannot see past her cerebral palsy, so she’s not allowed to take “normal” classes. Schism begins when both characters reach breaking point: Harrison is mid-suicide attempt when Katherine breaks into his home to appeal for his help to move into his Math class.

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: The Master Builder, Hand to God, Mrs Henderson Presents

In Audio, Features, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Native, Opinion, Plays, Quotes, Reviews, Ticket recommendations by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

This week the London theatre bloggers – including syndicate Mates Johnny Fox and Laura Kressly – discuss The Master Builder starring Ralph Fiennes, the musical adaptation of Mrs Henderson Presents, Broadway puppet transfer Hand to God, and Off-West End, Weald, just finished at the Finborough Theatre.

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Andy Capp rediscovered: Ought he to be ashamed of himself?

In Features, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

When commissioned by the Finborough, the young director Jake Daniel (one to watch) suggested dusting off Andy Capp The Musical, not least because he hails from near Hartlepool himself and, he tells me, he recognised the world he grew up in, a coastal area in the North-East where so many men had been left disempowered after years of severe decline in shipbuilding and other local industries.

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WEALD – Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Caroline Hanks-FarmerLeave a Comment

Being only playwright Daniel Foxsmith’s third full length play is rather a surprise, as WEALD is a work that radiates expert craftsmanship, which obviously shows experience is not a necessary component in comparison to sheer talent when constructing a masterpiece. Finborough Theatre, one of London’s leading venues for new works, is no surprise to be the theatre showing this very classy two hander.

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WEALD – Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

As picturesque as agrarian life may be with it’s rustic farmhouses, sweeping land and livestock, it is not an easy one for older and younger generations who just want to make a decent living. Faded and weather worn, Sam looks after his horses as he’s done his whole life; the younger Jim is all bouncy, boyish banter. The two clearly have much affection for each other in this emotive story of a tragic hero’s fall. But Daniel Foxsmith’s Weald, though full of poetry, passion and the ability to find the audience’s raw nerves, at just over an hour it sells itself short and lacks the sweat and earthiness of farm labour.

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STONY BROKE IN NO MAN’S LAND – Finborough

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

It was gruesome, politically problematic, tragic and heroic and wasteful; it was a turning-point in history. I have written before about how live, (very often fringe) theatre more than any other media has provoked fruitful reflection on the effects of WW1. Now the Finborough, with its eclectic specialization of long-forgotten or brand-new work, briefly brings back last May’s two-man play written and directed by John Burrows.

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P’YONGYANG – Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Aleks SierzLeave a Comment

Does Neil McPherson, artistic director of this fringe venue, have a direct line to the North Korean capital? In an uncanny coincidence he is opening In-Sook Chappell’s new play about everyday life in the Big Brother state in the same week as North Korea has announced that it has tested a hydrogen bomb. Similarly coincidental is the fact that Mia Chung’s You for Me for You, another play on a very similar subject, is still running at the Royal Court. Both of these studio plays paint a very similar picture of the deprivations visited on ordinary citizens.

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FLOWERING CHERRY – Finborough Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

Mid-life, an insurance salesman who will never be a big enough man to fulfil his big dream. Better to pretend- plan, to deny daily reality in the glow of an imaginary future and sanctified childhood memories worn meaningless by retelling. An anxious wife strives to hold on to her affection; there are two increasingly disaffected teenagers, an uneasy home atmosphere: ordinary failure and banal tragedy. Small wonder that Robert Bolt’s 1957 play was compared to Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman.