View Post

My theatre diary: Streetcar, My Night with Reg, Muswell Hill, The Lion and Dogfight

In Features, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Photos, Plays, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

Edinburgh aside, my August theatregoing has been sporadic, but here are a few shows I’ve seen recently that are worth catching if you can, especially now that the late summer sunshine seems to have abandoned us. As usual, I list them below in closing date order. If you follow me on Twitter (@TerriPaddock) – please […]

View Post

Embarking on my Edinburgh Festival Highlights adventure

In Edinburgh Festival, Features, Musicals, Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

In London, five shows a week is a serious haul. In Edinburgh, that’s small fry. When I was reviewing in Edinburgh, I could easily do twice that in a day. This year, this week, I’m experiencing the festival from a different perspective. I’ve been working with producer James Seabright and Festival Highlights, guest-editing content on […]

View Post

Why is Jamie Lloyd and Martin Freeman’s Richard III set in a 1970s open-plan office?

In Features, Interviews, London theatre, Opinion, Photos, Plays, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

When the production shots for Richard III were first released earlier this week, showing that director Jamie Lloyd had located the Bard’s bloody history play in a 1970s office block, my interest was piqued. After seeing the show at Tuesday’s opening night, my first reaction was to describe the resulting effect as “Get Carter meets […]

View Post

Hacked off: Bean and Hytner put the Great back into Britain with political satire

In Features, Interviews, London theatre, News, Opinion, Plays by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

The News of the World phone hacking trial may have ended yesterday, but the drama continues at the National Theatre where, less than 24 hours after the end of the eight-month trial at the Old Bailey, outgoing artistic director Nicholas Hytner this morning finally confirmed rumours that Richard Bean has indeed been working on a […]

View Post

Wanted: Small Asian children for Miss Saigon

In Features, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

Do you have a small, confident, South-East Asian-looking child? If so, Jo Hawes is looking for you. My interest was piqued when I attended Miss Saigon recently at the West End’s Prince Edward Theatre. On the cast credits page of the programme, just below the notification about American stars Eva Noblezada (who plays Kim) and […]

View Post

Never mind Titus: The West End is awash with blood

In Features, Interviews, Opinion, Plays by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

There’s been a lot of media attention around the Globe’s Titus Andronicus. Once again, Lucy Bailey’s production – which starred Douglas Hodge in its first 2006 outing and now has William Houston in the title role – has got audiences fainting on Bankside. Titus, with the strapline “brutality of the highest order”, is an extreme example […]

View Post

Who owns Shakespeare? Phyllida Lloyd and Harriet Walter lay claim for women

In Features, Interviews, London theatre, Opinion, Photos by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

“Julius Caesar rocked my world,” says Donmar artistic director Josie Rourke. She isn’t talking about the play alone, but rather Phyllida Lloyd’s acclaimed all-female production, which Rourke programmed at the Donmar Warehouse in late 2012-early 2013 before transferring it to New York for a run at St Ann’s Warehouse. Now director Lloyd is reuniting with star […]

View Post

Noel Coward in three events: Blithe Spirit, Relative Values and Tonight at 8.30

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

You only have three more weeks to catch Blithe Spirit at the Gielgud Theatre. Michael Blakemore’s production – and, more specifically, Angela Lansbury’s performance in it as dotty clairvoyant Madame Arcati – is undoubtedly one of the theatre events of the year. The “eventfulness” of the occasion has little to do with the play. The […]

View Post

Tony trivia: Twelfth Night is officially a history play

In Awards, Broadway, Features, London theatre, News, Opinion, Plays by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

Twelfth Night is generally classified as one of Shakespeare’s comedies, but last week it officially became a history play as well, after its phenomenal haul in this year’s Tony Awards nominations. Mark Rylance is already something of a Tony legend. He has won Best Actor twice for two other London transfers –1960s farce Boeing-Boeing in […]

View Post

What I learned today: Help! SOS doesn’t mean anything

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

With all the blood and gore – and fantastically poetic staging care of director John Tiffany and choreographer Steven Hoggett – Morse code may not be the first thing you associate with the National Theatre of Scotland’s production of vampire Let the Right One, now playing at the West End’s Apollo Theatre. But it nevertheless […]

View Post

Saskia Reeves’ two contrasting roles: The Mistress Contract and A Disappearing Number

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Photos, Plays, Reviews by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

Two things kept coming to mind as I watched The Mistress Contract at the Royal Court. The two-hander, starring Saskia Reeves and Danny Webb, is based on a memoir, authored by the anonymous She and He and published last year. The book, and subsequent play by Abi Morgan, details the couple’s three-decade consensual and contractual […]