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BAT OUT OF HELL – West End

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Reviews by Olivia MitchellLeave a Comment

Let’s make one thing clear: this show is epically crazy. Jim Steinman’s rock musical is like nothing else currently on any West End stage. It feels like a rollercoaster ride where things are constantly being thrown at you from every direction: the great, the good, the bad and the ugly sides of rock music are all thrown together to create a show like no other.

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BUGSY MALONE – Lyric Hammersmith

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

In April last year, the delightful Lyric Hammersmith reopened with a commendably well-structured stage version of Bugsy Malone. Great production values, props, costumes, fight direction and orchestrations. Reviving it for the whole of this summer requires three very young actors to play each of the seven leads so to keep consistency between performances, some pretty stringent direction has been applied.

YOU FOR ME FOR YOU – Royal Court

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Aleks SierzLeave a Comment

North Korea is the kind of place that haunts the imagination of the West – and not in a good way. One of the last hardline Communist dictatorships, it is also a country of immense sadness, a landscape of food shortages and human-rights abuses. Yet its regime calls this dismal place the “Best Nation in the World”. To us, it’s a secret world, a strange culture difficult to comprehend, easy to fear. Small wonder that, in American playwright Mia Chung’s 2012 play, two hungry sisters fantasise about leaving it for good.

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LORD OF THE FLIES – Touring

In Children's theatre, Manchester, Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

The sound of crickets chirping and the steady beat of tribal drums give way to shrieking and chanting. Boys with shredded school uniforms, ties wrapped around their heads and faces smeared with blood dart about the stage. Tumbling through foliage, climbing up mountains – they hold roughly sharpened sticks as they hunt down their prey.

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NEWS: Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre Presents LORD OF THE FLIES Casting and Full Tour Announced 

In London theatre, News, Plays, Press Releases, Touring by Caroline Hanks-FarmerLeave a Comment

Casting and full tour dates are announced today for Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre’s critically acclaimed production of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, which will return following its 2011 sell-out premiere for a limited run from Thursday 3 to Saturday 12 September 2015 prior to a major UK tour.

hang – Royal Court Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

In a bleak neon office (design by Jon Bausor) a much awaited new play by debbie tucker green, always modishly lower-case in titles, takes no prisoners.Except that it is about one, unseen and awaiting a capital punishment decision by his victim in some unspecified but British dystopia. Directed by the author, it is a 75 minute study in unreconciled trauma and the awkward insensitivities of officialdom and protocol. And perhaps (to a sympathetic ear) a good evocation of the perennial inability of non-victims to understand the tearing ,incurable dislocation of personality involved in rape.

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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD – Touring

In Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

Adapting Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, for the stage is a brave decision to make. The novel has recently celebrated its 50th anniversary, and besides being a staple on the GCSE curriculum, it has been translated into 40 languages and sold over 30 million copies worldwide. This humble, poignant and charming stage adaptation by Christopher Sergel pays homage to the legacy of the novel and everyone who has read it.

BUGSY MALONE – Lyric Hammersmith

In Children's theatre, London theatre, Musicals, Reviews by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

The list of gangster movies inspired by 1920’s prohibition-era Chicago is lengthy, but it was not to be until 1976 that British director Alan Parker was to redefine the genre with Bugsy Malone. His award-winning feature film was an inspired musical romp for children, with the classic themes of love and crime all scaled down to a kids-eye view of morality and with sub-machine guns converted to spray custard-pie “splurge” rather than murderous lead.