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NEWS: West End PR agency Target Live marks ten years, opens in Manchester

In London theatre, Native, News, Press Releases, Quotes, Regional theatre by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

Target Live – the UK’s only full-service marketing agency for live entertainment and the arts – marks its tenth anniversary with the announcement that the company is to open a new office in Manchester. Opening on Monday 20 February 2017, the office will be based within the Havas Village on Princess Street. The new team has more than 25 collective years of …

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HUSBANDS AND SONS – National Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews, Touring by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

Tender, fierce, intelligent and humane, this superb production reminds us that D.H.Lawrence was at his best a great interpreter of 20th century change. Years before the showy hysteria of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, (heaven knows why the BBC chose the worst of his works to dramatize) he wrote plays about his Nottinghamshire pit village, vivid with understanding humanity, humble observation and pity. Here are themes of marriage and pride, trapped lives and rich communities, possessive fearful mothers and feckless endangered sons. Here is class and money and the yearning for art and the painful the rift between generations when education takes the young out of manual work. Here too, noted with generosity, is the increasing independence of women.

WONDER.LAND – Manchester & London

In Musicals, Regional theatre, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

Fifty minutes in, we got a 30ft yodelling falsetto caterpillar with flashing saucer eyes, and I cheered up. It also, as it happens, sang the central message of Damon Albarn’s musical, centrepiece of the Manchester International Festival in partnership with the National Theatre ( Rufus Norris himself directs). The message is “Who are you?”, ‘cos it’s all about teenage self-realisation in the age of broken homes and feral schools under the cosh of Goveian superheads. This necessitates a girl’s escape down the rabbit-hole of the smartphone, to become a braver avatar of herself.

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KAFKA’S MONKEY – HOME, Manchester

In Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

There are not many performers who could accomplish what Kathryn Hunter has achieved in this version of Kafka’s A Report to The Academy, interpreted for the stage by Colin Teevan and masterfully directed by Walter Meierjohann – her transformation to a monkey is beyond physically impressive. Hunter is wholly mesmerising throughout the performance- from the top of her jaunty bowler hat right down to the tips of her crooked fingers when she extends her hand to greet. She holds a command over the language and projects it with a rich and expressive tone of voice and incredible physicality. From the moment that we first see her shuffle across the stage, her body depicts a bewildered beast trapped halfway between ape and human. Hunter performs with wit and precision – furrowing her brow, her arms swinging and contorting uncomfortably and her loping gait – every sinew of her body works to create an entity trapped between the two different states of being. Startled by the world, she exhales heavily through her nostrils admitting that questioning freedom “leads to the most profound disillusionment”.

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CONSTELLATIONS – Touring

In Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

Constellations, written by Nick Payne, follows the relationship between a man and a woman from the first time that they meet each other at a barbeque. The play is built on the quantum multiverse theory and goes on to visit Marianne and Roland at six different points in their relationship – exploring how certain situations, conversations and decisions can change the course of their lives together.

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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD – Touring

In Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

Adapting Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, for the stage is a brave decision to make. The novel has recently celebrated its 50th anniversary, and besides being a staple on the GCSE curriculum, it has been translated into 40 languages and sold over 30 million copies worldwide. This humble, poignant and charming stage adaptation by Christopher Sergel pays homage to the legacy of the novel and everyone who has read it.