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Nowt so queer as folk: Recapping the National Theatre’s queer theatre season

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Ian FosterLeave a Comment

It feels important to recognise what the NT (and the Old Vic) were trying to achieve, though. Queer Theatre looked “at how theatre has charted the LGBT+ experience through a series of rehearsed readings, exhibitions, talks and screenings” and if only one looked at lesbian women, two of the readings were written by women.

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FEATURED SHOW: Brimstone & Treacle at the Hope Theatre, ★★★★★ reviews are in!

In Features, London theatre, Native, Opinion, Plays, Press Releases, Quotes, Reviews, Sticky, Ticket recommendations by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

Have you seen the great reviews for our Featured Show, the 40th anniversary revival of Dennis Potter’s controversial masterpiece Brimstone and Treacle, which continues at London’s Hope Theatre until 20 May 2017. A selection of some of our favourite review quotes are gathered below…

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RIGHT NOW – Bush Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Caroline Hanks-FarmerLeave a Comment

You know you’ve seen something good at the theatre when you’re still thinking about it 24 hours later. Catherine-Anne Toupin’s darkly comic drama Right Now is as unsettling as it is often hilarious, with a plot that twists and turns until we (quite literally) have no idea where we are, and a conclusion that leaves a lasting impression and sends its audience away with just as many questions as answers.

THE DELIVERANCE – Edinburgh Fringe

In Regional theatre, Reviews by Thom DibdinLeave a Comment

✭✭✭✭✩ Fertile soil:
Involving, dark, human poetry is in great supply in The Deliverance at Assembly Roxy. Stellar Quines’ presentation of the third part of the story that began with The List is a success in its own right, as well as a worthy successor to what has gone before.

YER GRANNY – Touring

In Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Thom DibdinLeave a Comment

Hugely – if inconsistently – funny, but lacking real dramatic impact, Yer Granny at the King’s is certainly crowd-pleasing but does not seem destined to linger long in the memory. Douglas Maxwell has taken Roberto Cossa’s Argentinian comedy La Nona and transported it to 1970s Scotland for the National Theatre of Scotland’s touring production. A family of Italian descent are suffering financial hardship, due largely to the Granny of the title, a monstrous 100-year-old who is literally eating them out of house and home.