View Post

HANSEL & GRETEL – Museum of Childhood

In Comedy, London theatre, Opera, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

In the expansive hall and gift shop of the V&A’s Museum of Childhood, one corner has been set up as a playing space for Popup Opera’s Hansel & Gretel. Director James Hurley doesn’t focus on the darker elements of this fairytale, though. Using surtitles as a vehicle for humour and contemporary references, Popup Opera succeeds at making Englebert Humperdinck’s full-scale opera fun and accessible.

MACBETH – St Paul’s Church

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Even if the audience understands that Macbeth is about somebody who murders the king and sees witches, they still want to grasp what is happening line to line and scene to scene. When a play stretches to over three hours, this can sometimes be a daunting task, for actors as well as directors.

POLITIC MAN – Ivy House

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Alison Mead’s Politic Man chronicles the lives of Alfred and Ada Salter, an activist and political couple living and working in the Bermondsey slums of the early 1900s – I’d never encounrtered these remarkable people before. Avowed socialists committed to improving the lives of the city’s poor, Alfred moved from medicine into politics so he could help more people.

View Post

WONDERATIONS – The Canvas Cafe

In Cabaret, London theatre, Opinion, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Sunday evening was a night of new discoveries. The Canvas Café, just off Brick Lane, serves homemade cakes and prosecco by the glass. It also has walls you can write on and a cosy downstairs performance space. In that space was Ivy Davies and her show Wonderations, a gentle, joyful blend of spoken word, songs from her EP and questioning whether or not Mickey Mouse is actually God.

View Post

EGGS – The Vaults

In Comedy, Festivals, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Women get the raw end of the deal no matter how young or old they are, how mainstream or alternative. Two late twenty-somethings, acquaintances through a mutual late friend but with completely opposite personalities, end up bonding over important issues but with dry humour and restrained emotion. Despite the content, Eggs avoids catering purely to women.

View Post

ONE UNDER – The Vaults

In Comedy, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Amy Fleming’s dad committed suicide when she was four years old. Fleming struggles with mood swings and wonders if she’s “mental,” like her dad. Luckily, she studied Molecular Medicine before becoming an actor so she understands how genetics dictates our characteristics. She also knows that talking about our problems and developing positive habits helps us overcome them.

View Post

Laura Kressly: My top ten picks of 2015

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Carmen Disruption  This Simon Stephens deconstruction bore little resemblance to the opera. Instead, we had a cast of dysfunctional, damaged characters unable to connect with the world around them on any meaningful level. They filled the Almeida with an electric loneliness that grasped the desperate humanity residing deep inside us all before chucking us out, […]

View Post

SKYLINE – Ugly Duck

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

It’s panto season, and our stages are filled with villains, heroes and dames. Playwright David Bottomley’s new work-in-progress has some passing resemblance to the characters in Britain’s traditional seasonal offerings, but his new play on the London housing crisis is darker, angering fare. Capturing its victims’ lack of power and its perpetuators’ greed, Skyline doesn’t offer a solution but still states a clear opinion on the issue.