View Post

NEWS: Anne Archer stars in London premiere of The Trial of Jane Fonda

In London theatre, Native, News, Plays, Press Releases by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

Oscar nominated and Golden Globe winning actress Anne Archer will return to the UK to star as ‘Jane Fonda’ in a brand new production of THE TRIAL OF JANE FONDA, written by seven-time Emmy award-winner Terry Jastrow, and directed by Joe Harmston, opening at London’s Park Theatre on 13 July until 20 August 2016, with a press night on 14 July.

View Post

NEWS: David Burt joins The Buskers Opera, Crowdfunding launched for relaxed performance

In London theatre, Musicals, Native, News, Press Releases, Quotes by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The producers of The Buskers Opera, a brand new musical by Dougal Irvine (Departure Lounge, Laila, Britain’s Got Bhangra) and Park Theatre are today announcing the first-ever ‘relaxed’ performance at Park Theatre, to take place on Thursday 2 June 2016. The Producers of the show have launched a unique crowdfunding scheme in order help deliver this relaxed performance alongside their Arts …

View Post

British musical theatre has just had its Woodstock moment: I was there

In Features, Festivals, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Quotes by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

In case you didn’t attend and/or missed the viral buzz – incredibly, this industry event was one of the UK’s top trending events on Twitter for nearly 48 hours – Beam was a two-day event, jointly organised by Mercury Musicals Development and Musical Theatre Network on Tuesday 8 and Wednesday 9 May at London’s Park Theatre, under the slogan “shining a light on new British musical theatre”. And it more than delivered on the promise of that slogan.

View Post

Life and language in the Amazon, adapted for the stage

In Books, Features, Inspiring people, Interviews, London theatre, Native, Opinion, Plays, Quotes by Guest BloggersLeave a Comment

The book Don’t Sleep, There Are Snakes, sub-titled “Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle” was published in 2009. It tells the story of missionary Daniel Everett’s experience living with the Amazonian tribe, the Pirahãs. But rather than Everett converting the tribespeople, they converted him. Actor and director Sebastian Armesto, founding member of Simple8, explains why the company was inspired to adapt …

View Post

THE PATRIOTIC TRAITOR – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

This premiere for the Park is a cracker: a serious, grownup, constantly entertaining light on history with fine-drawn characters, and some acidly sharp philosophical resonances for today’s troubled Europe and our divided government. Jonathan Lynn wrote and directs: as co-author of the Yes Minister series and the recent (less impressive and even more cynical) stage play we know he has a sharp political eye. But this one is richer and more acutely perceptive than mere satire.

View Post

HALLO NORMA JEANE – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

When I was a student, I worked in a care home. Somewhere in a drawer I have a half-written short story about an old lady in a similar institution who remembers, through the fog of Alzheimer’s, two things: the heyday of Hollywood, and that she once “almost died”. Only on the last page does she tell her carer she once also had another name – ‘they called me Marilyn, Marilyn Monroe’. Bite me, it’s no nuttier than the plot of Hallo Norma Jeane.

View Post

Jeremy Corbyn and the art of the theatre publicity pic

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Pantomimes, Photos, Plays by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

When news of the Park Theatre’s pantomime, Rapunzel, came through earlier this year, I remember clocking the name of the hero character Prince Corbyn – names are never a coincidence when it comes to pantomimes, surely? But had naming considerations also played a part in casting the role? Finding an actor named Alex Hope to […]

View Post

DARK TOURISM – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

I’m a bit late on the curve catching this, but it runs all week with two more matinees, so Roll up! Shudder as you savour the freakish world of celebrity PR agents, tup’n tell journalism, fake reality-shows, slut-shaming, and career dieting . Meet some of the most topically revolting of contemporary male characters: all but one equipped with seriously wrong beards, from the Mark Thompson Bristle to the Russell Brand Silkie. Applaud the author’s creation of four cracking female parts, alongside and agin these monsters.

View Post

ROARING TRADE – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

It would be easy to dismiss Roaring Trade as ‘Boring Trade’, a 2009 quadrille for four unpleasant people in a dealing room which was stale long before the recession cut the rug from under bond trading.

Analysis of its theatrical failures is more complex: the set has the feel of ‘Enron’ but random scrolling data on a projected Bloomberg screen is neither realistic nor kinetic – post-Curious Incident we expect far more from back projection.

HATCHED ‘N’ DISPATCHED – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

‘Write what you know’ remains the best advice to any author and the story of how Michael Kirk picked up the plot of Hatched ‘n Dispatched from his 9-year-old observations of sexual shenanigans round the back of the Railway Institute in Derby is priceless. But years of exposure to sitcoms and pantomime mean his script, particularly in the larkier first half, can sound derived: the moment when Wendi Peters as grotesque matriarch Dorothy sends her daughters into the kitchen to cut sandwiches for a funeral with “you slice, I’ll butter” is lifted directly from an early Victoria Wood standup routine.

HATCHED ‘N’ DISPATCHED – Park Theatre

In London theatre, Reviews by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

It is 1959, Arthur is dead and as his family gather for the wake, there are drunken giggles to be had and secrets to be spilled. They don’t write ‘em like this any more and more’s the bloody pity, for in his debut full length play Michael Kirk together with Gemma Page has captured a slice of British social history, hinting at the incisiveness that once hallmarked the BBC’s Play For Today and which latterly Mike Leigh can occasionally capture on screen.