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TRAVESTIES – Menier Chocolate Factory

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Sticky by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

The result is a glorious intellectual spritzer, with Carr at its centre in a magnificent, defining, wittily commanding and endearing performance from Tom Hollander. As Carr in senility he frames the tale, a stooping querulous old mole in a ratty brown dressing gown and long-dead straw boater: in between times he and the hat reclaim their youth and the Zurich days.

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NEWS: Ruth Wilson opens in Hedda in Dec, Elizabeth Debicki joins Red Barn, New NT season

In London theatre, Native, News, Plays, Press Releases by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The National Theatre has announced full dates and further details for its new booking period, running from September 2016 to February 2017. Headline highlights for the period include: dates for Ruth Wilson taking the title role in HEDDA GABLER in a new version by Patrick Marber, directed by Ivo van Hove, and The Night Manager’s Elizabeth Debicki joining Mark Strong and Hope Davis in the cast of David Hare’s THE RED BARN, directed by Robert Icke.

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NEWS: Tom Hollander stars in Stoppard’s Travesties at Menier

In London theatre, Native, News, Plays, Press Releases by Press ReleasesLeave a Comment

The Menier Chocolate Factory today officially announces a major new revival of Tom Stoppard’s Travesties – the first London revival in over 20 years. Patrick Marber directs Tom Hollander as he returns to the stage to play Henry Carr. The production opens on 4 October, with previews from 22 September and runs until 19 November.

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AFTER MISS JULIE – Touring

In Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Helen McWilliamsLeave a Comment

Patrick Marber’s play is set in 1945 in an English Country House, the set of which rivalled downstairs at Downton Abbey! The play is inspired by Strindberg’s Miss Julie. Helen George plays Miss Julie, the only upstairs character we are introduced to in person, while Richard Flood plays John, her father’s Chauffeur and Amy Cudden plays Christine, the cook.

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: Seven Brides, Bakkhai and Three Days in the Country

In Audio, London theatre, Musicals, Native, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by As Yet Unnamed London Theatre PodcastLeave a Comment

Every week, a group of regular, dedicated, independent theatre bloggers gather together for intelligent discussion “from the audience’s perspective” about plays and musicals they’ve recently seen in London. Lively, informed and entertaining. My Theatre Mates is delighted to syndicate the (still) As Yet Unnamed London Theatre Podcast (AYULTP). Shows discussed (with timings) in this week’s podcast: Seven Brides for Seven …

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: As You Like It, The Red Lion, The Importance of Being Earnest

In Audio, Features, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Native, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by As Yet Unnamed London Theatre PodcastLeave a Comment

On this week’s podcast, leading London theatre bloggers discuss views on three plays: As You Like It at Shakespeare’s Globe, The Importance of Being Earnest, starring David Suchet as Lady Bracknell, and Patrick Marber’s new play The Red Lion, starring Daniel Mays at the National, as well as the most recent London revival of Broadway musical I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change.

Diary of a theatre addict: from the Tony’s to future Tony winners at ArtsEd

In Awards, Broadway, Features, London theatre, Musicals, News, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Mark ShentonLeave a Comment

I’ve been cramming the diary even fuller than usual, if that’s possible, over the last week, even allowing for the fact that I actually allowed myself a day off yesterday (imagine!), paying a social trip to have lunch with friends in Bath — and even resisting the temptation to see The Mother at the Ustinov studio, even though it had both a matinee and an evening performance I could have popped into see.

Diary of a theatre addict: from the Tony’s to future Tony winners at ArtsEd

In Awards, Broadway, Features, London theatre, Musicals, News, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Mark ShentonLeave a Comment

I’ve been cramming the diary even fuller than usual, if that’s possible, over the last week, even allowing for the fact that I actually allowed myself a day off yesterday (imagine!), paying a social trip to have lunch with friends in Bath — and even resisting the temptation to see The Mother at the Ustinov studio, even though it had both a matinee and an evening performance I could have popped into see.

THE RED LION – National Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

“This isn’t a church, it’s a ‘business!” What a sentiment for a theatre crowd to hear – or indeed anyone with an art, talent or craft within fifty paces of a cash register.

Back after nearly a decade in the dark, the writer Patrick Marber has mustered a slick three-hander. I am someone who actively takes against football. It’s a bloated beast which long trained its eye on the dosh, and has legions of devotees to do the explaining and the covering up for it. This play movingly demonstrates the dedication, and the devastation. All-consuming fandom and those riding it for every penny.

Diary of theatrical addiction: farewell to Hytner & Donmar in duplicate

In Features, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Plays by Mark ShentonLeave a Comment

In Twelve-step fellowships, it’s a common practice to do regular personal inventories that help you to own the consequences of your addiction, to yourself and others, and remind you of the benefits of staying ‘sober’. This now weekly column is a personal inventory of a sort, too, but this, at least, is an addiction I happily embrace. Last weekend I wrote here of having seen 10 shows in the previous seven days; this week I’ve seen a more modest seven shows, and had three whole nights off from the theatre, though was involved in theatre-related activities on each of them instead.

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CLOSER DONMAR WC2

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

NEW-GENERATION GUEST REVIEWER LUKE JONES UNIMPRESSED BY MARBER REVIVAL There were a lot of jokes about strippers’ arseholes.  Almost entirely for the joy of saying ‘strippers’ arseholes’. Was that funny in 1997? Half the audience seemed to remember why. But, … Continue reading →

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Review: Trelawny Of The Wells (Donmar Warehouse)

In Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

How splendidly the Donmar adapts to every new production: from the blinding pennants of the Spelling Bee school gym to the stark guns-and-gantries of the all-female Julius Caesar and now an authentically lamp-black pickled Victorian music hall with soaring columns, creaking boards and a whiff of oranges and cheap scent in the pit. Rose Trelawny is the darling of […]

The post Review: Trelawny Of The Wells (Donmar Warehouse) appeared first on JohnnyFox.

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Review: Trelawny Of The Wells (Donmar Warehouse)

In Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

How splendidly the Donmar adapts to every new production: from the blinding pennants of the Spelling Bee school gym to the stark guns-and-gantries of the all-female Julius Caesar and now an authentically lamp-black pickled Victorian music hall with soaring columns, creaking boards and a whiff of oranges and cheap scent in the pit. Rose Trelawny is the darling of […]

The post Review: Trelawny Of The Wells (Donmar Warehouse) appeared first on JohnnyFox.