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‘I’m not sure why we are approaching Broadway prices’: 10 questions for 10 years – Rebecca Caine

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Ian FosterLeave a Comment

Canadian soprano and OG Cosette, Rebecca Caine 

Rebecca Caine may have been in a couple of musicals you’ve heard of before, but my introduction to her was through Tête à Tête’s inspired take on Salad Days at the old Riverside Studios in Hammersmith, recollections of which below. She’s also one of the more entertaining people to follow on Twitter, just don’t mention anyone called Jonas… 

“Salad Days! Such a lovely production. I used to love pulling people out to dance with, some would dance me off my feet, as a Don in the pre show, seating Cameron Mackintosh, calling him Mackintosh Minor and telling him to pull his socks up and watching the happiness of the audience at the end when they were just happy to be silly on a sunny day in 1954 Hyde Park.”

Where were you 10 years ago?

Teaching at Trinity Laban and singing a lot of concerts, I think.

Best show you’ve seen in the last 10 years?

I adored An American in Paris.

What has been your professional highlight of the last 10 years?

Finally singing Barber’s Knoxville.

Top flavour of interval ice-cream?

I refuse to remortgage my home and I prefer to keep my bella figura.

What show do you wish theatres would give a rest for a few years?

Jukebox bollocks.

Name someone who you think is a really underappreciated talent (in the world of theatre)?

She’s not under appreciated because she never stops working but she should be a mega star- Anna-Jane Casey.

Elphaba or Glinda?

Glinda, obviously, I prefer a low larynx.

What is one thing that you think would help theatre survive and/or thrive the next ten years?

Lower ticket prices. All I could see was old white people at Hamilton. I’m not sure why we are approaching Broadway prices and yet the actors’ salaries in London are far lower. It’s pure greed.

Which is your favourite theatre?

Is it the Matcham theatre in Buxton or Belfast that has the Indian theme and the boxes are elephants heads? It’s a draw between that and the tiny Georgian one in Margate. Full of ghosts.

Can you say anything about what’s to come for you, (in the next ten years or otherwise)?

What am I, Mystic Meg? As James Mason once said- there’s a lot to be done in the garden.

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‘Hopeful, joyous and hilarious’: Harold & Maude – Charing Cross Theatre ★★★★

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Ticket recommendations by Jonathan BazLeave a Comment

When told well, coming of age stories are very often a reminder of the fragility and beauty of life, inspiring a carpe diem attitude tempered with immense gratitude. That the ‘Harold and Maude effect’ delivers this message completely liberated of any subtleties is a shining beacon of hope for humanity in otherwise trying times.

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FLOWERS FOR MRS HARRIS – Sheffield

In Musicals, Opera, Opinion, Regional theatre, Reviews by Edward SeckersonLeave a Comment

Taylor writes an altogether different kind of musical in which “songs” rarely arrive fully formed but rather are in the process of evolving – beginnings of songs which are content just being songful and serving as aides-memoires, melodic remanants which in some cases return again and again with all their emotional memory intact. Wagner called them leitmotifs.

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Review: The Mikado (Charing Cross Theatre)

In Musicals, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

The Mikado has to be Gilbert and Sullivan’s most accessible operetta. And with its princeling-in-disguise and not-quite-innocent heroine as his eventual bride, it’s not so far from pantomime that you couldn’t consider it a jolly seasonal alternative to Cinderella. Trouble is, it’s been done to death and updating it to the 1920s means unfortunate comparisons […]

The post Review: The Mikado (Charing Cross Theatre) appeared first on JohnnyFox.

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Review: The Mikado (Charing Cross Theatre)

In Musicals, Reviews by Johnny FoxLeave a Comment

The Mikado has to be Gilbert and Sullivan’s most accessible operetta. And with its princeling-in-disguise and not-quite-innocent heroine as his eventual bride, it’s not so far from pantomime that you couldn’t consider it a jolly seasonal alternative to Cinderella. Trouble is, it’s been done to death and updating it to the 1920s means unfortunate comparisons […]

The post Review: The Mikado (Charing Cross Theatre) appeared first on JohnnyFox.