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‘Vividly atmospheric & kinetic production’: OTHELLO – National Theatre ★★★★

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The National Theatre’s Lyttelton stage has been transformed with steps and terraces around the performance space, creating a look that is a cross between an ancient greek theatre and a fighting pit. Before the play starts, images of past productions of Othello and the year they were performed are projected onto the steps and back wall as a reminder of the story’s timelessness.

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‘The power is in the modern parallels’: RICHARD THE SECOND – Omnibus Theatre ★★★★

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Anna Coombs’ adaptation of Shakespeare’s Richard II sees the story slimmed down for five actors, with three of the cast playing more than one character. It focuses the attention on King Richard (Daniel Rock) and his cousins, the loyal Aumerle (Lebogang Fisher) and Henry Bollingbroke (Raheim Menzies), and the power tussle between them for the crown

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‘A profoundly thought-provoking play’: GOOD – Harold Pinter Theatre ★★★★★

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A victim of rescheduling because of theatre lockdowns, Good, starring David Tennant, finally gets in front of an audience but is it worth the wait? Tennant is a household name because of his screen work, but he is also a seasoned stage actor, taking on an eclectic mix of roles from Hamlet to Don Juan in Soho, so expectations are high.

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‘A brilliant ensemble piece’: EUREKA DAY – Old Vic Theatre ★★★★★

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There is a scene in Eureka Day at the Old Vic during which the audience is roaring with laughter, but it isn’t anything to do with the actors who are on stage or what they are saying. And it isn’t a mistake, it is intended, and it’s a genius scene for a couple of reasons, how the actors carry on regardless and the relatable source of the comedy.

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‘Some of the twists are gasp-inducing’: THE CLINIC – Almeida Theatre ★★★

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Tea drinking features heavily in Dipo Baruwa-Etti’s posh kitchen-set play The Clinic at the Almeida Theatre. But this tea may or may not have intoxicating or calming effects; even those who fervently dislike infusions get a taste for it. And that is The Clinic, a mix of contemporary family drama and something more difficult to put a finger on.

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‘Subtle but powerful’: WHO KILLED MY FATHER – Young Vic Theatre ★★★★

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I can now say I’ve seen Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio on stage. OK, so they were on telly on stage, but that is technically on stage. Kate and Leo were in Titanic mode, the favourite film of the son in Who Killed My Father. His homophobic father initially refuses to get him the video for his birthday.

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‘It feels like several plays mashed together’: THE FELLOWSHIP – Hampstead Theatre

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Roy Williams’ play The Fellowship centres on a small family unit, but there are a lot of big things going on. Dawn (Cherrelle Skeet) is grieving the loss of a child while caring for her terminally ill mother with little help from her high-flying lawyer sister Marcia (Suzette Llewellyn). She can tell her teenage son Jermaine (Ethan Hazzard) is lying to her, and if it’s about what she suspects, she will be fuming.

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‘You feel Amy Adams’ absence when she is not on stage’: THE GLASS MENAGERIE – Duke of York’s Theatre ★★★

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Amy Adams’ Amanda is a matriarch full of bustle and bristle in Jeremy Herrin’s production of The Glass Menagerie at the Duke of York’s Theatre. She is an irritating spark to her despondent and bored son and pushes her shy, nervous daughter Laura further into her own world. And, she is such a spark that you feel Amanda’s absence when she is on stage.