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‘The show sparkles with invention’: SWEET CHARITY – Donmar Warehouse ★★★★

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Reviews by Carole WoddisLeave a Comment

‘A sweet sexy fairy tale’ is how one critic described Sweet Charity on its opening in London in October 1967. And Josie Rourke’s final production as the Donmar’s artistic director before handing over to Michael Longhurst certainly lives up to that description, but also makes it something rather more and darker because of the unlikely casting of Anne-Marie Duff as Charity.

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THE GIRLS – The Lowry

In Manchester, Musicals, Opinion, Regional theatre, Reviews, Touring by Kristy StottLeave a Comment

Get a ticket and go and see The Girls. It is a phenomenal production. A thunderous applause and a well deserved standing ovation greeted the passionate performers and production crew on the press night. Being able to witness everybody around you in the stalls leap to their feet, cheering and clapping is a rare occurrence and a worthy testimony to show how fabulous The Girls really is. Just go.

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MACK & MABEL – Touring

In Musicals, News, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Scotland, Touring by Thom DibdinLeave a Comment

The Silent film era is the backdrop for a production of a musical that deserves to be shouted about.

Just why Mack & Mabel, running at Edinburgh Playhouse until 21 November, isn’t better known I can’t say. Maybe it’s that it’s never had the big screen treatment awarded to songwriter Jerry Herman’s Hello Dolly, Mame and La Cage Aux Folles.

If people remember anything about it, it’s generally that Torvill and Dean choreographed an award-winning routine to the overture.

SOMEONE WHO’LL WATCH OVER ME – Chichester Festival Theatre

In London theatre, Plays, Reviews by Caroline Hanks-FarmerLeave a Comment

This harrowing story written by Frank McGuinness tells the tale of three men taken hostage in the Lebanon. Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me first premiered in 1992 and took the theatre world by storm. Inspired by the hostage situations in the late 1980’s particularly those of Brian Keenan and John McCarthy the captives in the story are all invented by McGuinness. Michael Attenborough expertly directs this strong, often hard to watch, powerful play. Set in a cell in Beirut it tells of how these hostages get through this ordeal. Designed by Robert Jones the set is extremely creative giving you the claustrophobic feeling although sat in the open space of the auditorium. A single square with thin mats to sleep on, chained by their feet. Overhead we see pipes all seemingly filthy dirty and just a Koran and Bible to keep them company with no external contact to the outside world.