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‘Superb production of Coward’s self-revealing comedy’: PRESENT LAUGHTER – The Old Vic ★★★★

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Ticket recommendations by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

First of all let’s say that Andrew Scott is a marvel in Present Laughter, a 21st century Ur-Coward hero, who manages to do it without either the matey crassness lately inflicted on the part by Rufus Hound, or that retro, clipped Cowardspeak which echoes the Master too much.

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NEWS: Andrew Scott will star in Matthew Warchus’ production of Noel Coward’s Present Laughter at The Old Vic

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The Old Vic today has announced that Matthew Warchus will direct Andrew Scott in Noёl Coward’s provocative comedy Present Laughter, opening on 25 June 2019, with previews from 17 June. The cast also includes Luke Thallon, Sophie Thompson, Suzie Toase and Indira Varma.

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NEWS: Pippa Nixon replaces Sinead Matthews in Classic Spring’s The Importance of Being Earnest at the Vaudeville

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Classic Spring has announced that Fiona Button (Cecily Cardew) and Stella Gonet (Miss Prism) have been cast in Michael Fentiman’s The Importance of Being Earnest at the Vaudeville Theatre (20 July to 20 October 2018, press night is 2 August), with Pippa Nixon replacing Sinead Matthews as Gwendolyn Fairfax.

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GUYS AND DOLLS – West End

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Regional theatre, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

This is a revisit, to a partly recast Chichester show: and I must admit I had qualms about losing that generosity, that overflowing vigour you get with the classic musicals on the Festival Theatres’ great three-sided arena. Back in the retro, ornate proscenium world of the Savoy I feared it would be somehow constrained by the square magnificence. And, not least, whether the amazing 3D choreography by Andrew Wright and Carlos Acosta would feel cramped.