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bare. – Courtyard Theatre

In Comedy, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Three young women, three short solo performance pieces, three stories of vulnerability make bare., a thematically linked evening of new writing. Each of the three mini-plays has a distinct style and is performed by the writer. They vary in the quality of writing and inventiveness, and feel very new – more like scratch performances rather than finished pieces.

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THE BROKE ‘N’ BEAT COLLECTIVE – Battersea Arts Centre

In Dance, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Kids have it tough, especially if they’re poor. Decreasing social mobility, higher costs of education and living, and decreasing welfare are trapping our future generations in inescapable cycles of poverty. They are just as aspirational as young people from more privileged backgrounds and aware of the opportunities they don’t have. They are angry, frustrated and lack the opportunity to constructively express their feelings that often go completely disregarded by more comfortable members of society.

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WONDERATIONS – The Canvas Cafe

In Cabaret, London theatre, Opinion, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Sunday evening was a night of new discoveries. The Canvas Café, just off Brick Lane, serves homemade cakes and prosecco by the glass. It also has walls you can write on and a cosy downstairs performance space. In that space was Ivy Davies and her show Wonderations, a gentle, joyful blend of spoken word, songs from her EP and questioning whether or not Mickey Mouse is actually God.

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IN/OUT (A FEELING) – Hope Theatre

In London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews by Laura KresslyLeave a Comment

Sometimes, simplicity in narrative structure is more effective than twists, heaps of characters and subplots. Storytelling has been a powerful medium for time immemorial. in/out (a feeling) starkly depicts young, Eastern European woman Blue working in a London brothel after promised a cleaning job. Her client Ollie is a coked-up, suburban lad out for his mate’s stag do, but their encounter changes both their lives, at least for a little while.