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En garde for the French revolution in theatre (and I don’t just mean Florian Zeller)

In Features, London theatre, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Ticket recommendations by Terri PaddockLeave a Comment

I recently wrote about super-hot French playwright Florian Zeller’s London hat trick – with The Father, The Mother and, still running at the Menier Chocolate Factory, The Truth. As I sat down to catch up on my Theatre Diary of other plays I’ve seen recently, however, I realised London’s theatre landscape is going Gallic for far more than Zeller. In the West End alone at the moment, you can catch three heavyweight French offerings, even if you don’t realise it. All three have been given modern English-language makeovers and relocations.

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Weekly Theatre Podcast: The Maids, Correspondence, Welcome Home, Captain Fox

In Audio, Features, London theatre, Native, Opinion, Plays, Reviews, Ticket recommendations by As Yet Unnamed London Theatre PodcastLeave a Comment

This week the London theatre bloggers – including syndicate Mates Johnny Fox and Laura Kressly – discuss Jamie Lloyd’s West End revival of The Maids, Welcome Home, Captain Fox at the Donmar Warehouse and new play Correspondence at the fringe Old Red Lion Theatre.

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Diary of a Theatre Addict: 49 shows in six weeks, getting up to date

In Features, Interviews, London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews by Mark ShentonLeave a Comment

I’ve not updated my diary of a theatre addict for six weeks now — I was last here on January 31 — since when I’ve seen all of 49 shows, including outings to Newbury, Dartford, Clwyd, Manchester, Bromley and Cardiff, plus a week in New York. I’ve also taken an active part in two more shows by appearing onstage as a contestant in a theatrical re-run of Mr and Mrs with husband (so it was really Mr and Mr, we’re pictured above with host Samuel Holmes) and as part of David Bedella and Friends, his monthly chat show at the St James Studio.

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WELCOME HOME, CAPTAIN FOX – Donmar Warehouse

In London theatre, Musicals, Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews by Libby PurvesLeave a Comment

The Jean Anouilh plays I devoured as a neurotic sixth-former always had Antigone, Joan of Arc or Thomas a Becket heroically refusing compromise and salvation in the name of moral integrity. Ideal for a furious convent girl. I did not know his first big hit – the 1937 Le Voyageur Sans Bagages, which takes on a classic impostor-adoption theme (these were big in both sets of postwar years: think of Tey’s Brat Farrar, du Maurier’s The Scapegoat).