Mark Gatiss in The Madness of George III

‘A towering central performance by Mark Gatiss’: THE MADNESS OF GEORGE III – Nottingham Playhouse (Online review)

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On YouTube via National Theatre at Home – until 18 June 2020

The British fascination with the monarchy and the seemingly endless soap opera which is the Royal family continues to resurface periodically, even if it has been temporarily eclipsed by the coronavirus. Just this week there was a whole news item devoted to how the Queen had used Zoom for the first time (yes….and?), and in the last year or so we have had the saga of the Sussexes, the Andrew/Epstein imbroglio and Philip’s driving mishap.

Thus it ever was, and Alan Bennett’s early 1990s play The Madness Of George III examines similar public versus private monarchical concerns at the end of the 18th century in the latest stream from National Theatre At Home. I saw this production when it was broadcast to cinemas a couple of years ago, but it was well worth a revisit.

The original version with a multi-award-winning Nigel Hawthorne was produced at the National itself, whereas this time round they are responsible for the filming and broadcast of a production from Nottingham Playhouse. This shows regional theatre at its very best. The production headed by director Adam Penford sets a cracking pace – either that or there have been some significant cuts. It’s big on spectacle when required but also captures the more intimate scenes perfectly.

The whole is sumptuously staged with Robert Jones’ set design of classically angled walls repeatedly moved by bewigged servants to represent a multitude of locations; the costumes are similarly lavish. Both lighting and sound design (Richard Howell and Tom Gibbons respectively) are used to thrilling effect; the end of Act One remains, for me, one of the highlights of modern drama.

And what a feast of acting there is with a cracking cast who consistently deliver. The star turn (and it is a star turn) comes from an unmissable Mark Gatiss; if he doesn’t quite eclipse the memory of Hawthorne, he comes pretty damn close. Well used to playing grotesques, Gatiss seems to have taken some of his cues from the celebrated Georgian caricaturist James Gillray although I’m aware that is to imply a rather one-dimensional approach. In fact, Gatiss’s performance is multi-layered and technically highly accomplished. He leaves us in little doubt that the rigid rule-based system which George insists upon at the start of proceedings is partially responsible for his growing crisis and as the character falls apart in the first half the actor traces a carefully constructed arc of the descent into madness (or porphyria or whatever it was) in a performance that shows total commitment. Needless to say he is brilliant at the comic moments too and seeing him play two very different characters in rapid succession (he was equally good in last week’s broadcast of Coriolanus) demonstrates what many have suspected for a while now – that he is very good indeed.

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John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.
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John Chapman on RssJohn Chapman on Twitter
John Chapman
John Chapman works as a freelance education consultant, writer and copy editor. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Headteacher specialising in English and Drama. John first took to the stage as a schoolboy pretending to be a Latin frog. Decades later, he has been involved with 150+ productions, usually as an actor or director. He is currently a member of Tower Theatre in Stoke Newington, London. In 2016, he was in their “mechanicals” team that worked as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Play For The Nation, appearing both at the Barbican and in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 2004, he served as a panellist on the Olivier Awards; he is currently an Offies assessor. He reviews for a variety of websites, writes his own independent blog 2ndFromBottom about his theatrical life.

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