What’s In a Name at Theatre Royal, Glasgow . Touring

‘Class act from start to end’: WHAT’S IN A NAME? – Touring

In Opinion, Plays, Regional theatre, Reviews, Scotland, Touring by Lauren HumphreysLeave a Comment

Touring – reviewed at Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Matthieu Delaporte and Alexandre de la Patellière’s 2010 play Le Prénom was a hit of such magnitude it spawned not only a big screen French version in 2012 but a German film incarnation in 2018. Jeremy Sams’ translation, What’s in a Name? has arrived in Glasgow and proves to be a class act from start to end.

It’s the present day in a trendy double height loft conversion in Peckham, teacher Elizabeth (Laura Patch) is throwing a dinner party for her brother Vincent (Joe Thomas), brash, flash and with more than a hint of a Thatcher-era, boy-made-good bravado; all three-piece-suit, slicked back hair and ill-concealed misogyny. Vincent and his partner Anna (Louise Marwood) are about to become parents, lecturer husband Peter (Bo Poraj) and childhood friend Carl (Alex Gaumond), a trombonist with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, round out the company.

The revelation by Vincent of the name he intends to call his expected son, turns tiny tensions into a torrent of tirades, as every petty resentment  from the past thirty years surfaces. The accusations and recriminations fly, and some pretty big secrets are revealed.

What’s in a Name? may be the typical upper-middle class intellectual, philosophical fare that the French typically love, but this fast, furious, and funny social comedy, is a welcome breath of fresh air. The witty, rapid-fire dialogue shines a light perfectly on a certain strata of bourgeois British society and the “pseudo intellectual pick and mix” of values they hold. It’s all enhanced by a knock-out cast who deliver the linguistic gymnastics with class and flair. A touch of class for the autumn theatre season.

Lauren Humphreys on RssLauren Humphreys on Twitter
Lauren Humphreys
As well as blogging at Glasgow Theatre Blog, Lauren Humphreys is the Scotland Editor at The Reviews Hub (including its Edinburgh Festival Fringe Editor), and has written for Time Out, Groupon City Guide, TV Bomb, Broadway Baby, One Stop Arts and Stay.com as well as contributing to many European travel guides on culture in Scotland’s biggest city. Glasgow Theatre Blog has been voted the No.1 theatre blog in the UK in the Cision Media Rankings, in the Lastminute.com Top Ten and has never been out of the Vuelio Top Ten UK Theatre Blogs since its inception.

Lauren has also been the lucky recipient of the Oran Mor, A Play, a Pie and a Pint Critics Circle prize… twice. During the Commonwealth Games in 2014, she was one of 14 bloggers from around the Commonwealth chosen to be part of the official blog “Team 14”, writing about the cultural impact of the games. She teaches a workshop on theatre blogging as part of Glasgow's Tron Theatre Ambassadors programme, for students aged 15-18, encouraging the next generation of arts critics.
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Lauren Humphreys on RssLauren Humphreys on Twitter
Lauren Humphreys
As well as blogging at Glasgow Theatre Blog, Lauren Humphreys is the Scotland Editor at The Reviews Hub (including its Edinburgh Festival Fringe Editor), and has written for Time Out, Groupon City Guide, TV Bomb, Broadway Baby, One Stop Arts and Stay.com as well as contributing to many European travel guides on culture in Scotland’s biggest city. Glasgow Theatre Blog has been voted the No.1 theatre blog in the UK in the Cision Media Rankings, in the Lastminute.com Top Ten and has never been out of the Vuelio Top Ten UK Theatre Blogs since its inception.

Lauren has also been the lucky recipient of the Oran Mor, A Play, a Pie and a Pint Critics Circle prize… twice. During the Commonwealth Games in 2014, she was one of 14 bloggers from around the Commonwealth chosen to be part of the official blog “Team 14”, writing about the cultural impact of the games. She teaches a workshop on theatre blogging as part of Glasgow's Tron Theatre Ambassadors programme, for students aged 15-18, encouraging the next generation of arts critics.

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